lightonlight:

finally, the epic conclusion to the trilogy. poor tony, living with thwo a-grade trolls.
[Part 1]
[Part 2]
—————
[[I remembered that this part was still unfinished when I got to illustrate the “horse incident” from the edda. what a doozy. Again, sorry for the sketchyness, I am totally lazy with drawing anything besides work at the moment xD]]

lightonlight:

finally, the epic conclusion to the trilogy. poor tony, living with thwo a-grade trolls.

[Part 1]

[Part 2]

—————

[[I remembered that this part was still unfinished when I got to illustrate the “horse incident” from the edda. what a doozy. Again, sorry for the sketchyness, I am totally lazy with drawing anything besides work at the moment xD]]

omfg loki no FrostIron gorgeous art is gorgeous horse jokes get in the queue bitch
Keep up the feedback, guys! Meanwhile, I’m intrigued by frozenfoxfire's suggestion to combine dark and colored lines. Thoughts? :3

Keep up the feedback, guys! Meanwhile, I’m intrigued by frozenfoxfire's suggestion to combine dark and colored lines. Thoughts? :3

aRT Mav draws stuff frozenfoxfire yes good coLORSSS

I’m thinking of writing/drawing a visual novel, just for fun. Playing around with line-art styles, and I could use some feedback. Do you guys prefer the dark lines or the colored lines?

Mav draws stuff thoughts? :P mav has other stuff she should be working on but pretty kaeden is pretty shrug drawing is hard

mamalaz:

BBC Sherlock in the original Victorian era

Steve and his butt of freedom.
butts for paul you thought you were free weren't you paul YOU SHALL NEVER BE FREE OF THE BUTTS steve i have no shame get in the queue bitch
pfffft steve plz stucky bucky steve get in the queue bitch

negshin:

cloudyskiesandcatharsis:

Iconic quotes about Art and Creativity

Words of wisdom that puts a smile on your face ^_^

aRT get in the queue bitch
Dialogue and the “said” rule

wryan:

referenceforwriters:

By  Martyn V. Halm

The main reason for the ‘said’ rule, is that 'said' is invisible

If you write a whole page of dialogue, readers need to be able to distinguish between the speakers.

There are several ways of doing that:

  • Action tag: Peter threw the mug across the kitchen. “Don’t ever talk to me that way again.”
  • Name of the character in the dialogue: “Don’t ever talk to me that way again, Mary.”
  • Distinctive speech pattern: “D-don’t ever talk to m-me that way again.”
  • Inserting ‘stop’ words particular to the character. “Like, you know, don’t talk ever talk to me that way again, you know?”
  • Dialect: “Don’ evah talk t’me them way agin.”
  • Emphasize the words: “Don’t. Ever. Talk. To. Me. That. Way. Again.”

If you need to add a speech tag, ‘Peter said’ is pretty invisible. It’s similar to a stage direction: 

(Peter:) Don’t ever talk to me that way again.

The other part of the rule is that novice writers are tempted to pimp up their speech tags instead of the dialogue.

"Don’t ever talk to me that way again," Peter hissed.
"Don’t ever talk to me that way again," Peter threatened.
"Don’t ever talk to me that way again," Peter yelled.
"Don’t ever talk to me that way again," Peter bellowed.

If you need to increase the impact of a dialogue and you cannot think of a way to change the dialogue, adding an action tag is better than changing the speech tag from ‘said’ to ‘threatened’.

The twinkle disappeared from Peter’s eyes and he stepped closer. His voice was low, almost a growl. “Don’t ever talk to me that way again.”

If you need to make a point quickly, yes, you can use a different speech that from said. I believe in the “you can do anything you want” in writing. However, use it moderatively. 

Every rule can be broken, but most can be circumvented. The best advice is to use both as best as you can. 

Here’s another post that can illustrate this even further.

Again, you can do anything you want. 

Amateur writers tend to overuse substitutions for “said,” but the great thing about the word is the brain tends to skip over it while still recognizing who is speaking. If you have a bit of dialogue where two characters are speaking but never “say” anything, they “shout,” “hiss,” “holler,” “spit,” whatever, the reader is taken away from the dialogue and, in that moment, becomes conscious more of the act of reading than of reading the story.

Again, like all rules of writing, this isn’t a hard and fast rule. But to break the rules you need to know how they function.

YES THANK YOU WHAT I'VE BEEN SAYING said rule writing reference writing is hard get in the queue bitch
timsenblue:

Captain America:The Winter Soldier,Sebastian Stan .Chris Evans。Bucky Barnes ,Steve Rogers(from)

timsenblue:

Captain America:The Winter Soldier,Sebastian Stan .Chris Evans。Bucky Barnes ,Steve Rogers(from)

awww :3 all the gay steve bucky stucky gorgeous art is gorgeous get in the queue bitch

ellyosa:

thedistantgirl:

plagueutopia:

in-twilight-realms:

image

It’s back

I CANT STOP LAUGHING

this will always be my favorite

lost track of how many times i've reblogged this and i don't care hilarious get in the queue bitch besttt

saverockandrollera:

everyone on this website is slowly going back to school one by one its kinda like a horror movie but worse

not when you’re the one assigning the homework

MWAHAHAHAA mav teaches latin sometimes be afraid

merryweatherblue:

I took my little brother (who falls on the autism spectrum) to see Guardians of the Galaxy and after this scene he lit up like a Christmas tree and screamed “He’s like me! He can’t do metaphors!” And for the rest of the film my brother stared at Drax in a state of rapture. 

So for the last 6 days I have heard my brother repeatedly quote all of the Drax lines from the movie verbatim (one of his talents), begin studying vocabulary test words, and tell everyone he knows that people with autism can also be superheroes.

Now I am not saying that Drax the Destroyer is, or was ever, intended to be autistic. All I am saying is that it warmed my heart to see my brother have an opportunity to identify himself with a character known for his strength, badassness, and honor. And that is pretty damn awesome. 

So while I adored Guardians of the Galaxy as a great fun loving film with cool characters I can do nothing but thank Marvel Studios and Dave Bautista for finally bringing a superhero to the screen that my little brother can relate to.

beautiful guardians of the galaxy drax the destroyer get in the queue bitch
worthythor:

arrives 15 minutes late to avenge with starbucks

worthythor:

arrives 15 minutes late to avenge with starbucks

art-of-swords:

Anatomy of the Rapier
There are a lot of things that could be said and mentioned here, the rapier being quite a complex weapon, but this short and quick presentation should do. 
A rapier is a long, straight-bladed cut-and-thrust single-handed sword optimized for the thrust and featuring a guard that affords good protection to the hand; the rapier sees its apogee between the last third of the Sixteenth Century and the end of the Seventeenth.
The rapier anatomy of the rapier is broken into two distinct parts: The blade, and the guard.
Anatomy of the Blade
The blade of the rapier describes the long sharpened piece of metal which all the other parts surround or attach.
Tang
At the base of the rapier blade is the tang, which is a long tongue of metal that descends into the guard and ends at the pommel which is screwed onto threading or attached more permanently through [peening] or welding.
Ricasso
The unsharpened section of the blade beginning immediately after the tang. When placing a guard onto the blade, the crossbar block slides over the tang and then rests against the ricasso, preventing it from sliding further down the blade. The ricasso can extend from the crossbar block to the outer sweepings or guard shell (meaning the sharpened or more tapered edge of the blade begins immediately after the guard) or further down the length of the blade. The edges of the blade at the ricasso are square/flat.
Blade
The sharpened part of the blade is generally what is referred to when speaking of the ‘blade’. This part begins after the ricasso and is the part of the sword used for striking and defending.
Edge
The edge of the blade is oriented with the crossbar of the guard and aligns with the knuckle of the hand when holding the sword so that the knuckles lead the edge. On a rapier there are two edges that you can identify when it is held: the true edge (on the same side as your knuckles) and the false edge (on the same side as the base of your thumb).
Point
The part of the blade opposite the tang and pommel that is used for penetrating the opponent.
Strong
The lower half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for defense. In Italian the Forte.
Weak
The upper half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for offense (cutting and thrusting). In Italian the Debole.
Anatomy of the Guard
The guard of the rapier is the part that protects the sword hand of the wielder.
Pommel
A counter weight at the base of the blade, just behind the guard.
Turk’s Head
A spacer between the counter weight and handle.
Handle
The part of the rapier that you hold. Handles can be made of wood, wood wrapped in wire, wood wrapped in leather, and some other materials. Some handles are shaped to provide comfortable grooves for your fingers or provide other handling or comfort characteristics.
Crossbar Block
The crossbar block or alternatively the quillion block is a piece of metal that mounts to the blade just above.
Crossbar
The crossbar or quillions are a rod that extend perpendicular to the blade, on either side, and are used for protecting the hand, binding blades, and deflecting the sword of the opponent.
Sweepings
The rings and other rods that make up the guard and protect the hand.
Knuckle Guard
Sometimes referred to as the knuckle bow, the knuckle guard is a bar or bars of metal that extend down in front of the sword hand, protecting the knuckles. The knuckle guard can be used to identify the true edge of the sword.
Cup
The cup or shell is a solid plate of dished metal that surrounds the hand, typically in place of the sweepings, but sometimes in combination on some guards.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Western Martial Arts Wikia

art-of-swords:

Anatomy of the Rapier

There are a lot of things that could be said and mentioned here, the rapier being quite a complex weapon, but this short and quick presentation should do. 

A rapier is a long, straight-bladed cut-and-thrust single-handed sword optimized for the thrust and featuring a guard that affords good protection to the hand; the rapier sees its apogee between the last third of the Sixteenth Century and the end of the Seventeenth.

The rapier anatomy of the rapier is broken into two distinct parts: The blade, and the guard.

  • Anatomy of the Blade

The blade of the rapier describes the long sharpened piece of metal which all the other parts surround or attach.

  • Tang

At the base of the rapier blade is the tang, which is a long tongue of metal that descends into the guard and ends at the pommel which is screwed onto threading or attached more permanently through [peening] or welding.

  • Ricasso

The unsharpened section of the blade beginning immediately after the tang. When placing a guard onto the blade, the crossbar block slides over the tang and then rests against the ricasso, preventing it from sliding further down the blade. The ricasso can extend from the crossbar block to the outer sweepings or guard shell (meaning the sharpened or more tapered edge of the blade begins immediately after the guard) or further down the length of the blade. The edges of the blade at the ricasso are square/flat.

  • Blade

The sharpened part of the blade is generally what is referred to when speaking of the ‘blade’. This part begins after the ricasso and is the part of the sword used for striking and defending.

  • Edge

The edge of the blade is oriented with the crossbar of the guard and aligns with the knuckle of the hand when holding the sword so that the knuckles lead the edge. On a rapier there are two edges that you can identify when it is held: the true edge (on the same side as your knuckles) and the false edge (on the same side as the base of your thumb).

  • Point

The part of the blade opposite the tang and pommel that is used for penetrating the opponent.

  • Strong

The lower half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for defense. In Italian the Forte.

  • Weak

The upper half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for offense (cutting and thrusting). In Italian the Debole.

  • Anatomy of the Guard

The guard of the rapier is the part that protects the sword hand of the wielder.

  • Pommel

A counter weight at the base of the blade, just behind the guard.

  • Turk’s Head

A spacer between the counter weight and handle.

  • Handle

The part of the rapier that you hold. Handles can be made of wood, wood wrapped in wire, wood wrapped in leather, and some other materials. Some handles are shaped to provide comfortable grooves for your fingers or provide other handling or comfort characteristics.

  • Crossbar Block

The crossbar block or alternatively the quillion block is a piece of metal that mounts to the blade just above.

  • Crossbar

The crossbar or quillions are a rod that extend perpendicular to the blade, on either side, and are used for protecting the hand, binding blades, and deflecting the sword of the opponent.

  • Sweepings

The rings and other rods that make up the guard and protect the hand.

  • Knuckle Guard

Sometimes referred to as the knuckle bow, the knuckle guard is a bar or bars of metal that extend down in front of the sword hand, protecting the knuckles. The knuckle guard can be used to identify the true edge of the sword.

  • Cup

The cup or shell is a solid plate of dished metal that surrounds the hand, typically in place of the sweepings, but sometimes in combination on some guards.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Western Martial Arts Wikia

pets the screen sWORDS shiny things art reference writing reference things mav loves get in the queue bitch
Convince yourself that you are working in clay, not marble, on paper not eternal bronze: Let that first sentence be as stupid as it wishes.
Jacques Barzun (via kylara)
bitch(es) kneeling